Video

Eurasian Nuthatch

On 28th March (2018) I was out walking with my mum, when I spotted a couple of Nuthatches on the edge of a wood where we were just about to walk through, and I happened to notice that one of them was to putting mud around a hole in a tree, as it’s nest is in the cavity of the tree.

My mum and I was delighted to witness this and were both surprised at how close to the path it was.  Recently I purchased my latest video camera – my first semi-professional one – a Canon XF300 and decided I would return on a day with better weather and test it out on the Nuthatches.

On 5th April (2018), the conditions were perfect, so I went to where I observed said behaviour and thankfully the construction was continuing and below is what I filmed:

Thanks for visiting 🙂

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Video

Wildlife in April

Dash out in between the drip, drip, drop, little April showers and see the wildlife detailed in my short videos below:

(2012)

(2011)

Thanks for visiting 🙂 x

 

Video

Upton Warren: Eurasian Curlew

The now classified as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List, UK Amber and Red List species under the Birds of Conservation Concern review and as a Priority Species in the UK Biodiversity Action Plan – Eurasian Curlew are still holding on at Upton Warren in the landlocked county of Worcestershire in the West Midlands region, and they can be seen throughout autumn and winter, roosting at The Flashes most evenings.

For waders they’re large and tall, approx the size of female Pheasant – making them the largest European wading bird.  Their haunting call (‘Cur-lee’) is unmistakable – it’s one of my favourite bird calls – it can be heard from February through to July on its breeding grounds; wet grasslands, farmland, heath and moorlands.  From July onwards coastal numbers start to build up and peak in January.

Curlews feed on worms, shrimps and shellfish.  The largest concentrations of them are found at Morecambe Bay, the Solway Firth, the Wash, the Dee, Severn, Humber and Thames estuaries.  Greatest breeding numbers are found in north Wales, the Pennines, the southern uplands and east Highlands of Scotland and the Northern Isles.

The agricultural intensification (e.g drainage and reseeding) of upland farmland and moorland – plus the afforestation of moorland – is a big factor in the decline of their breeding population, as is the afforestation of moorlands.

 

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Video

Wildlife in September and October

Nature_SeptandOct_Collage

Below are some videos from my past, showcasing nature to be seen in September and in October. 💚  I am actually quite pleased with my voice-over work from-back-in 2011!  You might be happy to know, it is a skill which I’ve now honed.  😉

September (2011) 

October (2011) 

Apologies for the inaccuracies in the Fungi video; pronunciation of hallucinogenic and apparently you can eat  Amethyst Deceivers – but it is better to be safe than sorry!  (No matter how good a recipe sounds!)  😆

Thanks for visiting!  x

Video

Wildlife in August

A lot of birds are quieting down now, but Yellowhammers 🐤 are continuing to sing away!  Plus this is another great month for seeing some beautiful Butterflies! 🦋 

(The videos below were made a few years ago)

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Video

BBC Gardeners’ World Live 2017

Last year I did separate videos of my interviews with the at gardening celebs / presenters and garden designers.

This year I thought it would be better to edit the interviews etc of the show, into one video and that’s exactly what I’ve done in the short video below:

You can see last years videos by clicking: here!

Thanks for visiting! 🙂

Video

Wildlife in June

As I mentioned in my last blog post – a few years ago I made a series of short videos which were featured on the Reader’s Digest Magazine website, entitled Wildlife Monthly.  

Each video is around a minute or more, detailing flora and fauna (mainly fauna) for you to look out for; below I have included one video from my June 2012 edition and three from my 2011 June edition – each with a coastal theme.

2011

Thanks for visiting 🙂